The canal de Bourgogne

Published on 29 February 2008
The canal de Bourgogne at Buffon in the Côte d'Or Département
The canal de Bourgogne at Buffon in the Côte d’Or Département
(Photo : ASCO-TP)
The lock at Rougemont on the Canal de Bourgogne
The lock at Rougemont on the Canal de Bourgogne
(Photo : ASCO-TP)

 

A brief presentation of the Canal de Bourgogne

The economic benefits of a canal joining the Seine and Rhône basins, and hence the Mediterranean Sea with the English Channel, by connecting the Yonne with the Sâone had been recognised since at least the early sixteenth century. However, it was not until 1781 that the Etats de Bourgogne decided to fund construction.

However, the works were interrupted by the Revolution. They began again in 1822, but it was not until 1833 that the entire canal was opened to navigation.

The Canal de Bourgogne is 242km long and runs from Laroche (at an altitude of 80m) to St-Jean-de-Losne (at an altitude of 182m).

The canal follows the opposing Armançon and Ouche valleys, and crosses the line of separation between the Seine and Rhône basins at an altitude of 378m, by means of a 3,350 metre tunnel at Pouilly.

Traffic on the Canal de Bourgogne is heavy only on the section between Dijon and La Satine. The canal has a total of 189 locks. It is much used by leisure boats, which are catered for by 28 ports.

Click on the menu on the right to see the orginal plans for the canal.